Guided Imagery meets Seely Brown,Thich Nhat Hanh and Tolstoy

 

title

Thoughts on Pebbles, The Almond Tree and Tolstoy.
Is technology helping you as a guided imagery practitioner and end-user?


I can’t say for certain because everybody and body is special (we are all fellow travelers on the healing path) and we need to honor it! Yet, there is a good case to be made in both our current blog and reviews, The Pebble, Almond Tree and Tolstoy and on John Seely Brown's book for the good news. See, A New Culture of Learning: Cultivating the Imagination for a World of Constant Change by Douglas Thomas and John Seely Brown. (http://www.guidedimagerycollective.org/gleamings/a-commentary-review-on-a-new-culture-of-learning) It happens in our accessing tools (TECHO) embedded somewhere in hanging out in the digital soup kitchen – yes the digital - all things related – world wide digital like Indra’s web. So please relax and smile and have some green tea and dip into gleamings from Thich Nhat Hanh, Larry Dossey, John Seely Brown, Sri Aurobindo and Eleanor Rosch



Yes! digital intelligence - tools as a vast synthesis of creative intelligence. “We do not belong to the past dawns, but to the noons of the future. A mass of new material is flowing into us; we have not only to assimilate the influences of the great theistic religions of India and of the world and the recovered sense of the meaning of Buddhism (ed. mindfulness), but to take full account of the potent though limited revelations of modern knowledge (ed. A new Culture of Learning) and seeking; and, beyond that, the remote and dateless past which seems to be dead is returning upon us with an effulgence of many luminous secrets (ed. engaged guided imagery) long lost to the consciousness of mankind but now breaking out again from behind the veil. All this points to a new, a very rich, a very vast synthesis.”  Sri Aurobindo pg xix
Bhagavad-Gita and its message (http://www.amazon.com/Bhagavad-Gita-Its-Message-Publisher/dp/B004WF632S/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1308748796&sr=1-2)

The Digital soup kitchen which is collectively expanding our reach into the seen and unseen is that place where creative imagination flows through endless ingredients one of which is a simple visual image, an impression that we can access in the form (for example) of this simple attachment, a PDF – Pebbles, Almond tree and Tolstoy– as a free download. Of course dear reader it is a document and not a graphic novel so some reading will be required - mea culpa!
alt
Guided imagery is a poetry of visual landscapes, of interiors, exteriors, space and place. For the guided imagery user this form of matter  is a creative dance, it is as a catalyst for a positive space, the landscape can be the elements of nature, an eco-biology. In learning the language of water (thus the pebble practice by Nhat Hanh) we can advance our well–being by observing the bio–dance of small wonders in-being in presence. This small work of "Pebbles, Almond tree and Tolstoy are such a recipe for intentionality and kind of field trip into the fluid movements of storytelling, nature, and mindfulness. A harmonic convergence.

“Health is harmony, and harmony has no meaning without the fluid movement of interdependent parts. Like a stream that becomes stagnant when it ceases to flow, harmony and health turn into disease and just when stasis occurs. We are called to return to the concept of the bio–dance, the endless streaming of the body–in–flux” Larry Dossey

Engaged guided imagery is energy
 
Cooking in this digital kitchen also extends into the art of practice and witness informing levels of intuition through direct connection with content and being in right relationship with images as a palette or grammar/language  (see free tool Liquid Light http://www.guidedimagerycollective.org/guided-imagery-resources/blog). The intuition of oneself and other humans as a direct part of nature applies also to the energy level of experience (a bio-dance). “But it is also conveys pictorially. This may be by means of content: think of mountain landscapes with rushing streams and waterfalls or of winds tearing at trees and human clothing. More likely it is conveyed by design and the quality of brush strokes. Van Gogh’s vision is of a world so infused with chi that it fairly leaps off the canvas in great smears of paint, a world in which even the most bucolic of scenes seems invested with moving energy. Likewise, in narrative it is the quality and style of description that paints things in their energy aspect. Hemingway was a master of this: In the late summer of that year, we’d lived in a house in a village that looked across the river and the plains to the mountains. In the bed of the river there were pebbles and boulders, dry and white in the sun, and the water was clear and swiftly moving, and blue in the channels. Troops went by the house and down the road and the dust they raised powdered the leaves of the trees. The trunks of the trees too were dusty and the leaves fell early that year and we saw the troops marching along the road and the dust rising and leaves, stirred by the breeze, falling and the soldiers marching and afterwards the road bare and white except for the leaves. (A Farewell to Arms,) from:  If you depict a bird, give it space to fly. Eleanor Rosch

We also have access to the same degree of brush strokes in the patterns that reach into our experiences at every breath when we witness as in the Almond Tree. The internal ground is not a patchwork map of the external scene. Rather, it is holistic, global, and goes far beyond what is being directly observed. For instance, even though the person is facing the landscape, the internal ground is likely to extend continuously to what lies behind, underneath, and above us. Neither does the internal ground stop at the distant horizon that surrounds one. This is why the storyteller Tolstoy in the “Emperor and the Hermit” reminds us of the integrity of presence and caring and simply extending one’s ground in walking.

So, please download The Pebble, Almond Tree and Tolstoy - A little play-paper for entering presence, place, holy-ground, and the elements. Invest in some creative un-foldment for some minutes by opening your inner muse in entering the Pebble, Almond Tree and Tolstoy. As a work it is loosely borrowed (a re-mix) from Thich Nhat Hanh and friends. Enter this small work and smile as you dip into its simple path! This is how technology helps, by being delivered virtually into a symbol of the image from one of our mother’s gifts the earth element, a Pebble, an Almond Tree, and an Old Tolstoy Tale.

The Seed Impulse

This is why engaged guided imagery is a healing presence i.e. by its seed impulse of simplicity and essence, by guiding us into being mindful of the breath, and thankful for a smallish form of meditation on a simple element or image which can transcend being into Being. It then extends into a creative intelligence in its beauty of engagement into the elements and poetry of the senses that can be applied to healing energies. Let us be grateful to engage and be guided in creative imagination and with the digital and not so digital pots, pans and cooks in the kitchen. Namaste The Guided Imagery Collective



 



Add this page to your favorite Social Bookmarking websites
Del.icio.us! Google! Facebook! StumbleUpon! Twitter! LinkedIn! Joomla Free PHP
Trackback(0)
Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy

 




A visual tour into things
Guided Imagery for beginners.

Register to receive this free download.